Auckland,
25
January
2019
|
12:00
Europe/Amsterdam

Booking.com reveals what your nationality says about your travel preferences

Everyone has their own favorite way to travel. For some, it’s a time for adventure and adrenaline, whereas for others it is an opportunity to relax and unwind. New research commissioned by Booking.com,[1] the global leader in connecting travelers with the widest choice of incredible places to stay, reveals how your nationality is likely to impact your travel style.

So as the festive season is behind us and you start looking forward to your next vacation, ask yourself this: do your travel preferences lump you with your nation’s stereotype, or do you break the mold?

 

Thrilling and chilling: top travel motivations

For most nationalities, the top motivation to travel is straightforward: to get some downtime. Unsurprisingly, 85% of travelers says that “giving myself time to relax” is an important motivation to travel. This makes it the top travel motivation to all nationalities with the exception of the Danish and the French, who cite “being free to act how I feel” as their top motivation to travel.

However, when comparing top travel motivations between nationalities, it is clear that travelers from different corners of the world have different preferences. Argentinians seem most easily tempted by nostalgia (73% of Argentinian travelers say they travel to “rediscover past good times”), Chinese and Taiwanese travelers attach relatively high importance to “experiencing a simpler lifestyle (respectively 83% and 76%) and Japanese, German and Hong Kong travelers are most likely traveling to “get away from the demands at home” (respectively 66%, 72% and 80%). Finally, for some travelers, travel is a question of social status: particularly Indonesian (75%), Indian (75%) and Filipino travelers (80%) say their motivation to travel is to “go to places my friends have not been”.

Most global disagreement however exists on the subject of adventure tourism: Russian travelers say they like to spend their off-time “finding thrills and excitement”, while Dutch and German travelers rate this on average the lowest.